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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/24/2017 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    Bristles

    Ableton and Sylenth, how to?

    Yeah Lab nailed it there. Don't put pressure or expectation on your work, but don't limit it by thinking it will be shit straight out. If I could go back and give my old self tips I guess they would something like; 1. Learn one thing at a time. If you think you need to understand compression or EQ for example - learn it. Don't learn "just enough" to get a little better without getting comfortable with it. Not that you may fully comprehend it straight away but take the time to really get to know each thing you learn. 2. Don't dismiss music theory. I am still catching up on what I wish I learnt years and years ago with this one. Scales and chords will turn a jingle into a piece of music even in "EDM". It will quickly become clear as you make more music that knowing theory takes it to the next level. 3. Pick one DAW/Synth/Plug-In for what you need and get to know them. Similar to tip 1 but so important. I got so wound up in all the software and gear out there that I wasted the first 2 years of producing by not understanding anything I was working with. "Mastering" a few skills and programs will trump jack of all trades any day. 4. Sound design is awesome but not crucial. You will find your own sound. There is a lot of hype about new sounds and that's awesome but not everyone has to be the next Skrillex. There are artists out there that created something new like Flume and Skrillex (agree or disagree) then there are artists like DeadMau5 that, IMO are so good at what has been 'done' it takes it's own shape. A painter uses the same colours as everyone else but he paints his own picture - just worry about your picture not your paint. 5. Finish as many projects as you can. Possibly the most important for myself! I have tonnes of unfinished work, but every time I finish something I learn at least 2 things. If you don't learn something creative you will learn something technical and vice versa. Theory, structure, FX, mix and then master as much as you can. 6. Find a few people to give you honest feedback, don't spam everyone. Only a few of my friends ever give me real constructive feedback so i've learnt to only ask them (like @LabRat - Thanks man!). It means more and will help you way more than getting people give you half arsed comments like 'I don't like this kind of music but it's cool'. (The Skrillex, Flume and DeadMau5 points are just the examples I could think of. Some of you may disagree but just my opinion. Don't hate on me ADJF) Anyway TLDR; keep on keeping on and always ask if you want advice! oh and have FUN!
  2. 2 points
    LabRat

    Ableton and Sylenth, how to?

    Here's a link to a video I did a while ago about chopping vocals into samples and loading into the sampler. The principles apply to most audio so it may be helpful. 1. When looking for samples it all comes down to what you want to use and how creative you can be with them. It's a timely process and involves a lot of research but it's best to not get bogged down in the hunt. Listen out for some interesting sections in tracks, whether they're old Motown (very common) or loops in a sample pack, something will stand out and from there you can transpose, stretch and chop away. When cutting them up, you want the start of the audio sample to be the hit of the transient so when you pay it, it's hit on time. If the samples are short it's likely there can be a click at the end of that sample which will be a slight chop from the next transient. you can resolve this by fading the end of the audio clip inside the sampler, or in the workspace. It helps to EQ your samples to avoid any clashing of frequencies, which may be what's causing the track to sound odd. It's good to transpose the samples so they're in the same key. If you don't do this, everything will sound like turd - no nice way to say it. Here is a video on chord progression. Follow the guy's videos as they will be extremely helpful, and as his suggests in the beginning of this video, watch the video on scales first! 2. Scales are very important in music theory. They're the core to understanding the structure of chords and the progression of melodies - why you can play certain notes and why you cant. Learn your scales! Learn the difference between different types of scales and what they mean. Chords can get very complex, especially when studying jazz music but the video on above and the other links will be a great help in getting started. 3. Plugins (synths) can be used for a variety of different applications in the sound design process. You can use the basic wave shapes such as square, sine and saw for basic sounds or you can get more complex using wavetable synthesis, FM synthesis and modular synthesis to make wacky and aggressive sounds or even synthesised drum sounds. The point in time to use a VST instrument is at any time you wish to create an audio track (such as a melody) you play yourself. A virtual instrument is triggered by a MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) signal. In a nutshell, a MIDI note sets an address / set of instructions which is sent from the keyboard to the software. A MIDI note / location will have information such as the key to be played, the velocity of that note and the pressure it's played at. It sends a lot more information but we'll leave it to the basics for now. With the knowledge learnt from the scales, you'll be able to play a melody into your project with the use of a virtual instrument as the host for your sounds. 4. Everyone has a different workflow. I use to start with the intro, build to the middle and then the end - just like if you were listening to a track. Now days it's a bit different for me. I start on the main elements and get the body of it the way I want, then I'll move into structuring the rest of the track with the intro and outro then colour the track in with all the extra layers and FX. Watching other workflows may help you experiment with your own. There's no right or wrong way to do it. Hopefully this has been helpful for everyone. It's a bit basic, especially with the VST part but should be enough information to get the hang of it.
  3. 1 point
    Mitch

    Win $5k of DJ gear for remixing the Maccas theme

    I'm loving this competition
  4. 1 point
    Scottie

    Win $5k of DJ gear for remixing the Maccas theme

    https://www.pedestrian.tv/news/music/win-5k-of-dj-gear-for-putting-yr-spin-on-maccas-im/1af59e7f-b29c-42ee-8c93-32c976bddc5f.htm
  5. 1 point
    yizzle

    The 4 or 8 bar curse

    or maybe your 'witty' reply made them decide to go somewhere else. Derailed. Keep on Topic please.
  6. 1 point
    Mitch

    How do I record from my DDJ-WeGO 3 to my Laptop?

    **disclaimer: I have no experience with djay2 software on the ipad.** If you're using djay 2 on the ipad, it looks like you can record the mix to the iPad storage. I assume it's that red circle button in the middle up the top once you've finished your mix, you can transfer the recording to your computer. You can see how to do that over here -> http://help.algoriddim.com/customer/en/portal/articles/579292-how-to-export-your-recorded-mixes-to-your-mac-pc- NOTE: It's well documented across the Internet that you can only record mixes if playing songs stored locally on your iPad. If you're playing songs from spotify, the licensing restrictions on spotify don't allow the app to record the mix. Unfortunately the controller you have is somewhat limited in this aspect. Your only other alternatives are to plug the DDJ directly into your laptop. I see the controller comes with a basic version of virtual DJ, which has the ability to record a mix for you (I don't personally recommend this software).
  7. 1 point
    Umm... If you have it mapped for either traktor or serato they have built in record options.
  8. 1 point
    Doddy

    How do I record from my DDJ-WeGO 3 to my Laptop?

    This guy also is pretty awesome and has lots of stuff I recall watching way back when Hope these worked, as im at work and get ICT security 'access restricted' so, yeah..... Also I saw there is a manual for that piece of hardware, might be worth having a quick scroll through or find the online manual pdf and 'ctrl + f' and search alot quicker that way
  9. 1 point
    Doddy

    How do I record from my DDJ-WeGO 3 to my Laptop?

    I just had a quick googlefu and found this Its for the audacity settings to record the dj mix. Looking at some images, it looks like it has rca outs and usb, so I would try - as others suggested to me previously - with the rca > 3.5mm jack and get that into the pc and then record via audacity. *Note* take this with a grain of salt as I have not recorded a mix to a pc before. All this new digital trickery is harry potter wizard style IMO - That said some 'product' + record dj mix how to's should show you a few options.
  10. 1 point
    Doddy

    Where to start?

    I'm not 100% but I would assume the usb link would be enough, I have copied vinyl to hdd via usb cable and audacity previously, but from what I can recall, I don't think I was able to hear it through speakers. I just ended up cropping etc and with vinyl you can slightly hear it from the stylus on the record, but there was a visual representation that shows up in audacity. Have a play around and do some tests, it was fairly straight forward from memory. Sorry I can't be more thorough with my answer and I'm sure some of the other guys here will be able to add more detail
  11. 1 point
    Scixors

    Pics of your Set-up

    Production/ Mixing setup + some *Rubbish photo qual*
  12. 1 point
    Cupe

    Studio desk shelf for under $100 (IKEA hack)

    Guide to building a shelf for a production desk to raise screens or make more space to slide equipment under. Shelf 110cm wide: http://www.ikea.com/au/en/catalog/products/70282181/ $24.99 190cm wide: http://www.ikea.com/au/en/catalog/products/30282183/ $49.99 Legs: 16cm high: http://www.ikea.com/au/en/catalog/products/50273031/ $25 (pack of 4) 8cm high: http://www.ikea.com/au/en/catalog/products/30273032/ $20 (pack of 4) Basically measure it out and just drill the legs into the base wherever you need to, suit to fit. BEFORE (shit shelf) AFTER (IKEA hack shelf, 16cm legs, 190cm wide shelf) - Total cost: $99.99 (doubled up on legs):
  13. 1 point
    Cupe

    Studio desk shelf for under $100 (IKEA hack)

    Update
  14. 1 point
    LabRat

    Running To The Sea - Spitfire Bootleg :O

    After digging through the vault and listening to some old tunes I dug up this little stunner. This was done back in February 2014 and become one of the biggest tracks I made. I popped up snippets on Snapchat a week or so ago but thought I'd take a chance on the upload. I remember Soundcloud removing it a few years ago but tried my luck again. It's a private link but sharing it anyway. I reckon it could do with a bit of a clean up but I've uploaded it in it's original form. Am keen to hear your thoughts on what was a pretty big deal for me back then, and if anyone remembers it then hopefully it fuels the nostalgia!
  15. 1 point
    NitroMonkey

    Cosmic Gate - Fire Wire (Matt Ingle Remix)

    As the title states, I have embarked on an incredible journey to remix a legendary track and I am here to share my first 6 hours on the project. So far I have nutted out most of the elements trying to keep most of them as close to the original as I can. Some I chose to vary and give new life. I have not used any midi files to re-create the melody, this was plotted all by ear, and the vocals were cut directly from the original. So, I would really like to hear what you all think of what I have so far? https://soundcloud.com/mattingle/cosmic-gate-fire-wire-matt-ingle-remix
  16. 1 point
    LabRat

    Running To The Sea - Spitfire Bootleg :O

    Thanks man! That was the era I guess. I started out with all those guys so the influence was definitely there
  17. 1 point
    LabRat

    Where to start?

    haha it's no dramas man. We can spark ideas by sharing info so happy to help
  18. 1 point
    Doddy

    Where to start?

    Hi Lab and Bristles, I think you have sold me, and I will just get back into what I know and just get back into the game really. I think from there, as I do like the idea of creating your own beats and breaks/songs and whatever, I can use Ableton to create and then look into Serato and a cheapish laptop to run it on. I guess thats something I felt was missing in my setup. Also this may also enable me to get live on the laptop and be able to play clips on the fly and scratch over that or make some finger drum patterns and chuck accapellas ontop kind of deal or whatever. its been a while since I been out to the club, and last one I went to it was....funny actually, watching people dance to dub step was a good ole laugh. Good stuff! Thing is im a bit older, have a good job, house and can afford to drop money each month if I really want something so thats nice. The other thought was a project race car, but I would be starting from scratch with tools and knowledge so this might be a bit more reachable. Thanks its been good to get some ideas out and have an articulate conversation with others who know a bit more than your average Joe and not just get a blank stare and say 'radio?' Cheers guys
  19. 1 point
    LabRat

    Where to start?

    With the boom in new technology, live shows have transformed into something unique. As I was talking in your intro thread, the sync feature helps me flawlessly drop in acapellas or other samples during a set. I think going digital was the best for me and I suggest giving it a go. I'll forever be grassroots, vinyl DJ, but you gotta move with the times and be as creative as you can now days. The launchpad and ableton offer some unique features to get you going. Machine is an avenue to look at and since you already have one it could be a better start. Like Mitch said, you do whatever you like, as long as you feel the enjoyment from it. I think when people spin wax now days it brings a sense of wonder back to the audience and the old boys feel the nostalgia which it's nice in a digital world. I played a gig with CDs one time purely to be a little different and I had more interest in it than I thought! Got a few high fives and thumbs up for "going old school" lol you gotta have fun doing it at the end of the day
  20. 1 point
    Mitch

    Where to start?

    The answer to this question, is whatever you like! There's no rules - if you feel like getting back in touch with your mixing roots, do it. If you feel more inclined to focus on production, that's cool too. If you've got the time.... Vinyl mixing is still well about - digital is also popular. What's coolest/best is purely opinion based.
  21. 1 point
    Mitch

    TOTD?

    throwback
  22. 1 point
    Bristles

    Add vocals into your mixtape, how?

    Yeah true for each track it will sound smoother introing.. more personal. "Dis ya boi IgnisOfficial on BBC radio bedroom!"
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