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AUSTRALIAN DJ FORUMS

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 19/07/18 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    LabRat

    Music genre’s and locations

    Hey dude! Yeah there's a few common names that float around here. So DJing wise, I started when I was 15 and started doing 16, 18 and 21st parties and stuff. Moved into the wedding scene but hated it so entered a few dj comps and started playing in nightclubs. It's a pretty hard gig here in Perth. Breaking into the scene is pretty much like anywhere else but on a much smaller scale. I started playing in venues when I was 19 and pulled the pin when I was about 26. I had a decent run but I there were a few people that didn't want me around and drove me out of the biz. Kinda sucks but I'm happier this way. It was getting real messy towards the end and I was losing all the passion I had for it. Producing wise, probably been doing it as long as I've been djing. I have some stuff floating around the usual online stores, had some of my tracks played by some Aussie big wigs back in the day which is always nice. I also played alongside a few of them. I felt stuck here in Perth, like I couldn't progress any further than where I already got. The scene here changes at a rapid pace too so unless you adapt you really have a short life span. But that's ok coz I played some killer shows and broke some hearts (other djs egos) in the process so I'm happy with that 🙂 I'm still claiming I was the only DJ to ever have an encore at my last residency haha I'm also claiming that I promoted one of the biggest Saturday night events the city had seen in recent memory. I'm willing to debate that with anyone that thinks otherwise 😂 All that aside, I still dabble in a bit here and there but definitely not taking it as serious as I once was. Having said that, I have been fishing around for the motivation to get back into it so we'll see what happens in the future. So that's a super small and watered down version of my life. Who's next?
  2. 3 points
    LabRat

    Kouki - Only One [Trump'd Music]

    Since my absence from the music industry I never had a second thought to write or release anything or promote another party. It's been 3 years now and since I sold my car I've been looking for another hobby to fill in my boredom. I fired up Trump'd again on a VERY small scale. There's a few releases under the Trump'd banner ready to go, which I'll post through out the year. My commitment levels are no where near what they were when I was full-time and I have no idea what's relevant but I'm gonna put out some tunes anyway. Here's the latest one. It's only available via stream on Spotify and Apple Music (amongst others). Once I sort out my distribution to Beatport I'll probably put out some DJ friendly versions for the venues and such. Enjoy.
  3. 3 points
    Craig

    USB to Rekordbox

    Thank for the help @Scottie and @Cupe, I read through that section of the manual and that didn’t work for me, none of the star rating changed. What I did stumbled across that worked was this, Step 1: Insert the USB device Step 2: Expand the playlist I want the update Step 3: Click the track or tracks I want, I clicked track 1, scrolled to the bottom, held shift and click the last track (100 in total) Step 4: Right click and select *Update Collection* Step 5: Done Seems so simple now, cheers for the help tho fellas!
  4. 2 points
    Mitch

    Focusrite Scarlett OS X Mojave

    Got it sorted. Had it going through a USB hub which had no issues with previous laptop & OS X Yosemite... Different combination of cables/adapters etc. got it sorted
  5. 2 points
    Cupe

    *Live* Kick on's mix

    tbh I appreciate that you're sticking around and contributing quality conversation and content. It's getting hard to keep this place cranking. Thanks
  6. 2 points
    Nice mix there mate!
  7. 2 points
    BeatLeSS

    Music genre’s and locations

    Located in Brisbane. Love anything with a broken beat first and foremost mid tempo, Glitch Hop and Ghetto Funk particularly but have been finding low tempo bass emerging well lately. Have a collection of most genres that have been dug from the depths over the years with different flavours to it that I love spinning.
  8. 2 points
    OxyKon

    Music genre’s and locations

    i was witness to this so can confirm. i started out from friends of mine who showed me the ways of vinyl, then i met @LabRat through a Tafe connection when we DJ'd a fundraiser which was 8yrs ago, he introduced me to this forum and they havent been able to get rid of me since LOL. I spin mainly Drum & Bass, hardcore Dubstep (Rapestep or whatever you want to call it), bit of breakbeat and hip hop on the side. Like labrat i too got sick of the Perth scene, too many tards that will stab you in the back or not look openly on other people who are trying to break into the scene with talent, it's all who you know. Labrat and I also had a residency at a local online radio station which we got a few gigs from but that fell in the ass after about 2yrs. I don't mix as much i used to, but i drop something every now and then, mainly in the 3rd weekend of March of every year
  9. 2 points
    Craig

    Pics of your Set-up

    As a new member it's only fair I contribute to the set up thread 🤙 Currently I have the XJD-RX2 with 2x JBL 3 series LSR308 with Sennheiser HD25's headphones, some LED strips and a little RGB in the corner. I also have a few indoor plants like palms and elephant ears that are usually behind the decks and in the corners to give it more of a calmative effect. On a side note, scrolling through the 105 pages in this thread, the evolution of the technology is incredible!!
  10. 2 points
    Scottie

    USB to Rekordbox

    Maybe this? https://rekordbox.com/_app/files/img/rekordbox4.0.0manual_en1001g.pdf If you update the star rating on the decks, then unplug the USB and then plug it back into the decks, has the star rating stayed updated?
  11. 2 points
    BeatLeSS

    TOTD?

    I finally tracked down one of my fav songs from @Cupe's Journey mixes.
  12. 1 point
    Swanflight Cases

    Hi, were swanflight

    Hi 🖐️ Just a quick introduction my names Peter i work for a UK flightcase company called swanflight.com, we currently manufacture and export allot of cases to Australia so we thought why not make the process easier by creating a website just for you. I hope this post is OK if not admins please remove, I'm not trying to sell anything here just get some feedback, see what you guys think, and hopefully get some ideas and interest. We manufacture everything in the UK and have the fastest production time of any case company even custom one off cases can be delivered to Australia within 10 working days. Please check out the site and let me know what you think (good and bad reviews are both appreciated) If you have any questions please feel free to drop me a message Kind Regards Peter Swanflight.com https://www.swanflight-australia.com/
  13. 1 point
    Swanflight Cases

    Hi, were swanflight

    Hi Cupe, ill just add a link to our website rather than spamming it with loads of different products, thank you 🙂
  14. 1 point
    LabRat

    Pics of your Set-up

    So bit of an update after all the years of no updates. With a plummet in motivation and lack of general hobbies I've decided to invest some time in music again. Since I'm in the same room all the time with my other work, everything looks exactly the same as it has done for years and it doesn't exactly spark inspiration. I figured it was time to change a few things up. First Before Now So now it comes time to do something with that wall. The obvious choice are soundproof panels but I'll need to evaluate the room before I do that. Theres a product I can get where I can print directly to sound proofing materials so I might do something a bit custom and use it to advertise the business too - win win. Anyway, I put the old monitors back in and it's given me so much more room. Also joining the studio are these babies Here's a list of the shit I have on my desk at the moment - 2011 iMac running Snow Leopard is the star attraction running Ableton 9, Logic 9, and MOTU Digital Performer 10 DAWs (all in epic 32bit mode) - Scarlett 2i4 drives the audio - 2x Behringer Truth 4" monitors and a KRK 10" sub with a KRK polarity switch (on the desk) makes the noise - Akai Mini MPK, Novation Launch Pad and a Roland A49 are the midi controllers of choice - Korg Triton Extreme Workstation (in the other room) provides extra synth goodies when required - Washburn D10-sk and an Ibanez AW65 account for the acoustics - Ibanez G10 is called up for electric guitar duties Here's a list of the shit I hope to have on my desk soon - Join the 64bit nation and upgrade the iMac to join the 21st century - Ableton 10 is probably going to be the DAW of choice over Logic (probably a stupid idea in the end but I've been using Ableton for the last 3 years or so) - Plugins will require updating so I'll do that to Hopefully this keeps me amused for a while.
  15. 1 point
    Craig

    Music genre’s and locations

    Evening / morning or whenever you’re reading this. I’m still quite new here and noticed there’s only a few active users that post or reply to topics, so I thought I’d throw out the question to see what genre of music you like to mix, spin or produce or if you hold residencies ect.. Me, I’m located on the Gold Coast in Queensland, I focus on tech house – techno – base house, started mixing when I was 18, did the club scene for 2 years and gave it all up. 10 years on I’m now getting back into it. Gig wise I do some private parties / house parties and the od roof top Saturday – Sunday session. I’d like to take it a step further and do events weekly but I need to regain my skill set. Fire away 🤙
  16. 1 point
    Craig

    *Live* Kick on's mix

    If you're feeling as dusty as I am this morning, I congratulate you on your efforts. Recorded live in the very early hours of the morning, this is my kick on's set. Was an enjoyable night to say the least, seeing the sun rise was also nice a touch tho 👌 As normal, constructive criticism is alway welcomed, throw a like, a repost or follow, all the support is much appreciated 🤙 Enjoy!!
  17. 1 point
    NitroMonkey

    Live Essentials of Trance 083

    Here is my latest live recorded Trance show. In this show I have targeted it to be a 'closing set' mix exploring the harder more driving elements of a 140BPM set while still having some epic uplifting tunes too. I hope you enjoy this one. Don't forget to like, share and comment on the mix as it will help with supporting my mixes. Thanks! https://hearthis.at/tyD23cbZ/matt-ingle-presents-live-essentials-of-trance-083-recorded-live/
  18. 1 point
    UFO! & Silent Killer - Downfall (Jump Static Remix) | Herd Killing Recordings Scott & Ace, the father & son junglist duo aka Jump Static from Delaware, USA have done it again! This remix showcases their skills, with an upbeat, aggressive and uplifiting warping neuro basslines, breakbeat science and sonic hooks that makes this track irresitible. Stream here: https://orcd.co/kill09 *** *** Listen: https://soundcloud.com/herdkilling/ufo-silent-killer-downfall-jump-static-remix-coming-soon *** Follow: https://www.herdkilling.com/
  19. 1 point
    LabRat

    *Live* Tech House Roof Top Session

    digging this one man! making the paperwork much better this morning
  20. 1 point
    BeatLeSS

    Limiters?

    Dragged my 8" monitors to a house party the other weekend and the tweeters have blown. Definitely at some point the signals were entirely maxxed, from dj controller to mixer console to speakers. I wanna put something in the chain that can prevent something like this happening again, where I can setup the gear and walk away knowing noobs can push their signals as much as they want. Is a limiter something I should be looking for here? Anyone got any experience, recommendations?
  21. 1 point
    Craig

    USB to Rekordbox

    @OxyKon That's roughly the method I use. As I mix mostly tech house and base house, I've combined Mixed in Key with the star rating. Using harmonic mixing and using the start rating helps me know what direction the set will head and what energy each song will bring. 2-3 star is early in the set 4-5 is peaking set, obviously reading the crowd as well.
  22. 1 point
    OxyKon

    USB to Rekordbox

    nice find @Craig, i've never done it that way before, although i always rate my tracks once i purchase them, and i have a different method of rating haha, 1 star means it's just the standard genre of track, 5 stars means it's the most brutal track you've ever heard 😛
  23. 1 point
    Cupe

    The best DJ Controllers of 2018

    New generation DJ controllers now have the combined functions of a player, mixer, and a software control mechanism, as well as many available connections for digital audio, to allow DJs to conveniently create their own high-quality beats and music. What does a DJ controller do? A full manual DJ setup is usually composed of the following separate components: a basic DJ controller (or another device that plays the audio), an audio interface that exports the audio to an external hardware and software, and a DJ software that provides sound effects and supports the controller with the mixing, aside from the DJ headphones and a good speaker system. Over time, users found it to be more convenient to have a single device that already does all the playing, mixing, and sound controlling—and that’s where modern DJ controllers come in. Integrated, all-in-one DJ controllers make it a lot easier for beginners and professionals to pull off a professional DJ set. They do everything from connecting two to four audio decks into the controller’s channels, giving any DJ easy access to different tracks for seamless mixing (with smooth transitions and matching beats between different audio channels) and customization (with the help of high quality equalizers, sound effects, and compatible DJ softwares) while enhancing the audio quality of your music for dance floor speaker systems. You’ll find many different kinds of DJ controllers varying from a little more than $140 to almost $3,000, but they all typically include many of the same elements to help you deliver an amazing show. Control Surface The control surface, or the mixer, covers the biggest area on the controller and gives you full control over settings and software functions. They commonly feature the following elements: Knobs – A DJ controller typically has multiple sets of knobs. The first set, which is also called Gain or Trim, serves the purpose of manually setting the sound level of its own audio channel, so you can make sure that all channels are of the same overall volume. The second set is usually composed of three knobs (treble/hi, midrange/mid, bass/low) for sound equalization. The rest includes the Booth or Monitor knob, for setting volume levels for the mix; the Master knob, for adjusting volume levels of the Master Out or final sound output; and the Cue knob, for adjusting the headphone volume. Jog wheel – Also known as a job dial, shuttle dial, or shuttle wheel, the jog wheel is a type of knob, ring, or dial that can be used in order to increase or decrease the speed of your audio or video media when fine-tuning beats (beatmatching). Pads – Controller pads are the square-shaped buttons usually made of soft, rubbery material. Some controllers replace all jog wheels with pads on the control surface, but are perfectly good for beatmatching, chopping vocals, layering decks on top of each other, slicing through tracks, adjusting the length of slices, enabling loops, or even “finger drumming.” Faders – Sound signals travel through faders, which act like a faucet and can gradually increase or decrease the level of an audio signal with a horizontal or vertical slide of the knobs. DJs utilize crossfaders when transitioning from one audio track to another or when they want the crowd to hear both tracks, in which case the slider should be positioned in the middle. Buttons – Buttons on the control surface are usually for selecting which channels you want to hear before bringing it to the floor (also called Cue Mix selection buttons). Screens – More advanced and full-featured controllers have screens that indicate audio levels and other parameters, which give you more freedom to focus on the controller alone instead of staring at your laptop. Ports – Audio and USB ports allow you to connect to your channels or give you direct connections to your audio files without an external player. Audio Interface Chances are you already know that how you hear audio from your headphones will differ from how your crowd will hear it from the sound systems, because your player or computer is not intended for high resolution output for music production. The audio interface helps amplify and improve the sound output from your DJ controller or computer by preparing the audio input and ensuring that you get the best version of your music while sampling or recording from more than one source. It may be built into your controller or come as an external device. It may also have outlets for your headphones, computer, or any other sound processor. External Hardware Control Some DJ softwares use external devices—such as computer mice, keyboards, touchpads, or even tablet and smartphones—for control. However, it can be time consuming to select and go through menus using such devices, which is why highly integrated DJ controllers make things easier by providing full operational functions and configurations within the device. The Best DJ Controllers of 2018 Numark Mixtrack 3 All-in-One Controller for Virtual DJ Native Instruments Traktor Kontrol F1 DJ Controller Native Instruments Traktor Kontrol Z1 Native Instruments Traktor Kontrol X1 MK2 Allen & Heath XONE:K2 4-Channel Professional USB DJ MIDI Controller Native Instruments Traktor Kontrol S2 MK2 Pioneer DDJ-SR 2-Channel Performance for Serato DJ Native Instruments Traktor Kontrol S4 MK2 Numark NVII Intelligent Dual-Display Controller Pioneer Electronics RMX-1000-W Remix Station Native Instruments Traktor Kontrol S8 Pioneer Electronics DDJ-RZX Controller Numark Mixtrack 3 All-in-One Controller for Virtual DJ, $149 (Shop Now) This Numark DJ controller was specifically designed for aspiring professional DJs, but is also one of the best DJ controllers for beginners. It has new and improved, high-resolution jog wheels, 16 multi-function performance pads, offers multiple FX manipulation, and includes the Prime Loops remix tool kit. Choose this controller if: You want a trusted all-in-one controller for an affordable price. Native Instruments Traktor Kontrol F1 DJ Controller, $199 (Shop Now) This Native Instruments Remix Decks controller has four volume faders, four dedicated filter knobs, and 16 colorful pads (which also replaces jog wheels) to give you complete control over slicing, looping, editing, and reconstructing audio samples. It also works seamlessly with the Traktor Pro 2 software. Choose this controller if: You work better with pads and are a big Traktor Pro fan. Native Instruments Traktor Kontrol Z1, $219 (Shop Now) The Traktor Kontrol Z1 is a 2-channel mixer, controller, and sound card with a user-friendly work surface that gives full control over volume, sound equalization, effects, and even filters. This NI controller also offers advanced control over remix decks. Choose this controller if: You want an affordable and compact controller to run Traktor Kontrol with while hooked up to your iPhone or iPad. Native Instruments Traktor Kontrol X1 MK2, $219 (Shop Now) The Native Instruments X1 MK2 controller works with existing Traktor rigs. It can control Traktor FX units and control two decks at the same time. Thanks to its version update, it offers smoother, more precise control over sound effects and more. Choose this controller if: You have older gear but want to make the most out of Traktor Pro. Allen & Heath XONE:K2 4-Channel Professional USB DJ MIDI Controller, $299 (Shop Now) The Xone:K2 has a high quality 4-channel sound card that works with a wide range of DJ softwares, provides up to 171 MIDI commands across 3 layers, saves on computer USB ports by linking of multiple units using its X:LINK feature, allows you to create a customized layout, and even doubles as a stand. Choose this controller if: You want both portability and high quality in a small MIDI DJ controller box. Native Instruments Traktor Kontrol S2 MK2, (Shop Now) Despite its higher price tag, this all-in-one Traktor DJ controller is well-loved for its capability to work with Apple devices via its Lightning port. It uses the Traktor DJ app and offers dual hands-on decks with the coveted NI software. Oh, and it has more than 30 FX and can control up to 64 loops with its Remix Deck control. Choose this controller if: You want iPhone or iPad capability and more FX choices. Native Instruments Traktor Kontrol S4 MK2, (Shop Now) The S4 MK2 is the upgraded and enhanced version of everybody’s favorite classic Native Instruments controller. It has no screen, but it’s well-built, ergonomic, and has iOS support. Choose this controller if: You’re a 4-channel Traktor user but prefer manual jog wheels. Numark NVII Intelligent Dual-Display Controller, $699 (Shop Now) The Numark NV line was the first to give DJs the convenience of having a screen on their controllers and the second, upgraded version is well-loved for its slimmer size and more affordable price tag. Aside from the integrated display, this controller offers a wide array of dedicated hardware controls for all of the most essential software functions. Choose this controller if: You prefer to use the Serato software and focus on the controller instead of your laptop. Pioneer Electronics RMX-1000-W Remix Station, $799 (Shop Now) The compact RMX-100-W comes in a sleek pearl white body, which offers a refreshing and attractive alternative to the usual black. It boasts of its Scene FX section, where users can choose between five Build Up effects and five Build Down effects, aside from other sections that add a wide variety of unique sound effects. Choose this controller if: You want access to many additional built-in remix sound effects for better control of musical developments. Native Instruments Traktor Kontrol S8, $1199 (Shop Now) Regarded as the best flagship controller that provides the best Traktor integration, this top-of-the-line controller has screens that allow you to go laptop-free, and enables timecode use. While it has lesser jog wheels, this “smart” controller provides flexible standalone options for any serious DJ. Choose this controller if: You want the most fully-featured and highly integrated controller in the market—and can afford it. Pioneer Electronics DDJ-RZX Controller, $2999 (Shop Now) The Pioneer Electronics DDJ-RZX is a premium professional DJ controller that offers 4 channels, two full-sized jog wheels, three 7-inch touchscreen displays, mic output with special effects (Echo, Reverb, Pitch, or V-Tune), and many other additional functionalities and effects that can contribute to a spectacular full-length show or concert. Choose this controller if: You have serious money to spend for a complete, professional controller set with plenty of add-ons. Tips for Buying a DJ Controller Now that you’ve checked out our best DJ controllers for 2018, you may be asking yourself this question: “What DJ controller should I buy?” Before dropping your hard-earned cash on any of these controllers, you’ll want to make sure that it will actually be worth your money and time. After all, there’s no point in getting a controller that doesn’t fit your needs, as it will simply go unused and you’ll just end up buying one again. Below are some of the main factors to consider when buying your own DJ controller: Build Quality and Portability You’ll want to make sure that your DJ controller is sturdy enough to hold up and last you for a long time. If you’re a mobile DJ who has to lug the controller around to perform at different venues, you’ll definitely want a portable and lightweight controller with durable knobs, pads, buttons, and jog wheels that you won’t have to replace right away. Whether you’re looking for a controller for recreational or professional use, you may want to consider well-known brands (such as those mentioned above) to ensure that your controller has passed good quality standards for use and build. Controls Do you already have a set budget and a preferred brand, but unsure about which model to go for? You can consider the controller’s layout and available controls. Make sure that you can work with its arrangement comfortably and easily. As you progress in your craft, this is one factor that you should never overlook. After all, the best DJ controller for you is the one that you can work best with. Software and Hardware Compatibility Today’s controllers typically come with bundled software that has been tried and tested in terms of compatibility. Some DJs use other softwares, but unless you have significant experience in using a different software, you’re better off using the recommended software for a more seamless operation and optimum functionality. You’ll also want to make sure that its audio interface has the right amount of input and output ports, depending on your specific needs. This also greatly depends on whether you’re building a modular set up composed of separate devices or going for an all-in-one controller to make up a full DJ setup, so it’s best to plan ahead in terms of hardware needs. SOURCE
  24. 1 point
    BeatLeSS

    The best DJ Controllers of 2018

    It's all just midi commands, the software evolves and the controllers can stay relatively consistent. The all in one controllers can't really change that much more as a regular setup (CDJ/DJM combo) hasn't changed at all either. The features between CDJ's, for instance the diff between the CDJ900 and CDJ2000 being the auto-loop vs hot cue buttons, are all programmable between the DJ software and the controller.
  25. 1 point
    Cupe

    Mobile Producer Bags: Roundup Review

    Many producers travel with some version of their studio with them – bringing essential tools for making music on the road. In today’s roundup review, DJTT contributor Stu G shares some of the bags that he personally has found to be particularly effective for his own mobile studio. Subpac Backpack Best Feature: a sleeve for a SubPac S2 inside of the bag Mono FlyBy Best Feature: A standalone/removable laptop bag that’s built into the FlyBy Magma Bags Riot Backpack Best Feature: Accordion zipper that allows bag to expand 3 additional inches in width for loading a second piece of gear. Magma Bags Riot Carry-On Best Feature: Can fit a club mixer and a second controller on top
  26. 1 point
    Cupe

    Pioneer DJ DJS-1000 Review

    Most of you have probably seen the SP-16, or perhaps even have owned / used one. I have one at home, and to be honest, it really doesn’t get as much of a workout as I’d like. Since the launch of the DJS-1000, just the simple fact of it being shaped like a CDJ has reinvigorated my interest in the product line. Anyone familiar with the CDJ-2000NXS2 can instantly recognise the basic features of the unit (like the start/stop, pitch, and menu selector placement) so let’s skip over those. Instead, here’s quick overview of the more unique layout elements. The unit has 16 RGB pads which control the samples that you load up through the Nexus2-style touchscreen. The pads also have different modes to control samples. Slice breaks a sample up into individual slices across the pads while Scale mode allows a sample to be pitched across the pads. Pioneer has a pretty good demo of each mode here: Below the pads sits the 16 beat step sequencer and it’s associated scene buttons which allow you to cycle through different pad layouts and sequences. To the left is a touch strip, which gives you live performance control of the samples. Above the strip is a new FX section. The FX are now controlled by an on/off button and depth knob, much like you’d find a DJM-style mixer. To top it off, they’ve also added a new button which takes you straight to the effects list. You can also change the effect parameters easily with the 6 parameter knobs below the screen. The function of these knobs will change depending on what screen you’re currently on, such as when you’re editing samples, they can be used to change the attack, delay and release and so on. They’ve also added two little nudge buttons underneath the pitch slider which sits happily with our good friend, the sync button. How It All Works The DJS-1000 has 16 pads, which on the default screen each control an individual sample. It’s just like you’d find on any MPC-style device – tap the pads and trigger sounds, such as drum hits, synth shots, vocals, and so on. For each sample, you can dive into it and adjust it like you might in a DAW – controlling the sample’s ADSR, start/stop points, amplitude, etc. You can use the DJS-1000 by itself and simply adding one shots to your DJ mixes, but where it really shines is when linked and synced together with a full DJ setup. Sync locks the tempo of the DJS’s sequencer with your CDJ/XDJ players, allowing you to transform your set by layering custom audio sequences into the mix. The unit comes with a few premade projects and samples to get yourself familiarised. Once you’ve exhausted the built-in sounds, load up samples by dragging and dropping onto a USB thumb drive. The DJS-1000 has a USB slot on top, just like a CDJ – but it is worth noting that there is no SD card slot. Preparing a project file does take a bit of time. It’s similar to building an original song on a DAW, spending time to sequence drums, synths, and effects. Once you’ve gotten used to the workflow, it’s quick and gratifying. To sequence each sample, there’s two options: punch it into the step sequencer, or play the part “live” on the pads and record it in (quantization is available. You can edit each individual step with options for volume, key, and even offsetting it slightly for a bit of swing. Toraiz SP-16 vs DJS-1000 Missing Filter? Not Quite Aside from overall form factor, the most noticeable difference between these two units is the missing Dave Smith filter, not present on the DJS-1000. Instead, it’s replaced by a DJM-style FX control area. I think this is preferable, because there’s now an active master effect (which can also be assigned to individual pads) instead of just filter on the SP-16. The FX on the DJS-1000 can also be assigned to a filter – but it admittedly doesn’t sound anywhere near as beastly as the Dave Smith one. CDJ-style Syncing Another feature the DJS inherited from the CDJ line is the pitch slider and sync/master buttons. Yes, the SP-16 also has these features – but they’re hidden under a quagmire of menus. The DJS has made it much more intuitive to adjust pitch and activate sync, yet again reinforcing who this unit is for (if you forget, it’s right in the name: DJs.) Sync is what makes this unit really shine as you can play, beatmatch, and mix your own projects as if you were playing them off a CDJ. It’s also great fun to change parts of your song on the fly with the sequencer and still have everything in time. If it (or the other tracks) fall slightly out of time, Pioneer DJ handily added nudge buttons to let you fine-adjust the tempo manually. Where’s The Outputs? Unfortunately, it’s not all good for the DJS-1000. The SP-16 came with a whopping four dual 1/4” TRS outputs. The DJS-1000 has been relegated to just a single dual 1/4” TRS output along with a single dual RCA output. This again seems like a reflection of the change in intended use case from production desk to DJ booth. The SP-16’s outputs were great, allowing creative users to route drums to one output and top line elements to another, while still having two outputs left over. The DJS now limits that to splitting it just two ways and on top of that, with two different connectors. The good news is for users with other outboard gear, the DJS, retains the SP-16’s MIDI I/O ports and functionality. This is especially good news for DJs with a CDJ setup but who don’t have a DJM mixer with MIDI I/O: it’s a way to have synced outboard gear using your own mixer. Very Similar Overall Everything else has pretty much remained the same from the SP-16 onto the DJS-1000. They both share almost exactly the same backend and software, aside from some small tweaks related to the layout change. Both units read the same files, and projects are interchangeable between units meaning you could do the same performance on either one you choose. Who Is The DJS-1000 Good For? What perplexed me the most about the original Toraiz SP-16 was a lack of intention. It was hard to answer “who is this gear made for?” In the end, I found that most of the people who used it tended to be house or techno DJs. These genres are more receptive to layering and the SP-16 was the perfect tool for adding that extra bit of flavour to a set. Essentially, I saw the original SP-16 only as something you’d use on top of an already-playing song. The more I use the DJS-1000, the more I realize it’s potential to play your original productions broken down into stems and remixed on the fly, especially now that it works much like a CDJ. It is also great for beatmakers. Those who use Maschine, Push, or MPC-style systems will be instantly familiar with this kind of workflow. Unlike offerings from NI and Ableton, you don’t need to connect it to a computer for it to function. Instead, quickly plot out the ideas in your head or even make a fully-fledged original song. You can even use one or two of these standalone to perform a full set if you’re so inclined, but that’ll mean spending many hours making different projects and songs on the device. You can’t just load up full songs and trigger them with the pads – because there’s a 32 second sample limit. In Conclusion At first appearances, I was really not that excited by the DJS-1000. To me, it was just the SP-16 in sheeps’ clothing. Finally getting to use one helped me realize that that’s exactly why’s it’s special: Pioneer DJ have made the same live production gear much less intimidating to use. They’ve implemented a lot of quality of life adjustments so that you can get your ideas out quickly and easily. But be warned: Just because it’s easier to use doesn’t mean you can just buy one and immediately start rocking a dance floor with it. The DJS is a device that rewards those who put in the hours to make projects as without them, this unit is just an overpriced drum pad. Get one, spend some time with it, and it could seriously bring your sets to the next level. Source
  27. 1 point
    LabRat

    The best DJ Controllers of 2018

    I feel like this list never changes. It's been years since I've looked at anything but the same controllers are still on that list. Are they still good controllers or no one is making anything anymore?
  28. 1 point
    Scottie

    Simple free solution for ADJF Radio?

    it'll probably save the video but it'll be muted the whole way through
  29. 1 point
    I approve this mix, it was very meaty and very sunday seshhy
  30. 1 point
    dflux4

    Back once again for the ..

    Welcome back homie, I've had a recent hiatus myself and find myself back at home in the ADJF community.
  31. 1 point
    Disco Techs Aus

    Back once again for the ..

    I used to be part of this forum years back and had work with another business doing some repairs for some of the users on here. Its been maybe 4-5 years since I've logged onto here, even tried seeing if i could log onto my old account but that email belongs to a former boss which I can no longer access. The purpose of my signing up once again however is to inform some (if not all) of you that my main focus in the industry now is to service and support DJs with their electronic equipment. We are a humble small business based in the south-east of Melbourne and have spent a couple of years building up a base of hard working djs that respect their gear and keep it well looked after. Now I can understand that most of you DJs, work is your livelihood and the way you make an earn in this world. Some of you even might have gone as far as to learn how to service and manage your own equipment over the years. Our purpose here is only to offer our services if needed or if you are not able to maintain your equipment yourself due to your super busy lives (we get it). So if any of you require electronic advice on gear or equipment (decks, speakers, lighting, video etc) do not hesitate to get in touch with us at Disco Techs . Mention you're from this forum and we will happily look after you : ) Many thanks Lukas
  32. 1 point
    DJ Techtools’ Mobile Maven, Angel, is back with another tutorial. This time, he’s showing off a handful of incredibly useful and practical MIDI mappings that every mobile DJ should check out. These mappings include echo freeze, censor, loop active, and keylock. In this tutorial, Angel shows off what these mappings do, why mobile DJs will find them so useful, and how to map them to your DJ controllers. Traktor Is Better With Mappings I’ve been using DJ programs since about 2007, first on Virtual DJ, then fooled around with Mixx, then made the switch the Traktor. With Traktor, I’ve never had a stock controller with pre-mapped features that I wanted or needed for my workflow. A few years ago I was working with another DJ friend of mine and he showed me all the nifty pre-built/pre-mapped effects that come on Pioneer DJ’s DDJ Serato controllers. As a mobile DJ, sometimes it can feel like Traktor isn’t quite optimized for my workflow – so that’s why I made this tutorial. This edition of mobile tips is about mapping a few handy effects that are just as useful for the mobile scene as they are for the club or turntablists out there. Here are the effects we’re going to be mapping: Echo Freeze: A easy, one button solution for transitions, or for cutting a sound short on the fly without the abruptness of just hard-stopping a track. Censor Button: A simple way to “edit” curse words when you don’t have a clean edit but want to play the track anyway. Loop Active: A feature I first used during turntable routines, allows you to start a song ahead of a saved/cued loop, and the loop will activate once the playhead reaches said loop, all done hands free. Keylock on/off: The keylock On (Preserve Pitch) is mostly just for fun or for being creative. When active, this turns off the Preserve Pitch which when a turntable platter or tempo is changed, the pitch bends with the change of speed of the track. Just like back in the analog days! How To Map These FX In Traktor If this is your first time mapping a controller, let’s get to where we need inside Traktor and get everything setup. This works on any controller that has free buttons to map stuff too. Your steps to get to the Controller Manager are: Open Traktor Select the little gear to open preferences at the top right corner Click on Controller Manager Click on “Add” in the device setup area Select Generic MIDI from the drop down Choose your MIDI device as both the in and out port Leave device Target at “focus.” I use 2 tracks, so I find it easiest to use either 1 button on the side of Deck A and one on Deck B on my controller with platters, or if you’re using a separate controller like the Midi fighter or a Maschine, pick two free buttons side-by-side for easy locating. Echo Freeze Let’s start with all the commands we need to make this effect work as a “one-button” effect. Go to Add In and select the following: Mixer > FX Unit 1 On (Select FX Unit 2 On for Deck FX Unit > Dry/Wet Adjust FX Unit > Knob 1 FX Unit > Knob 2 FX Unit > Knob 3 FX Unit > Button 1 FX Unit > Button 2 FX Unit > Button 3 FX Unit > Effect 1 Selector FX Unit > FX Unit Mode Selector All your commands are ready, let’s pick a button to map it too. Click on your first command in the line (FX Unit 1 On) click LEARN, it will light up orange, then push the button! You should see the button’s MIDI address appear to the right. Do this again for every single command for the effect. Once you’ve mapped your button you need to change the Type of Controller to BUTTON Assignment: The Assignment buttons should be set to the following FX Unit 1 ON: Assignment to: Deck A (or Deck Everything else: Assignment to: FX Unit 1 Buttons 1, 2, 3, FX Unit 1 On: All of these under Interaction Mode, need to be set to, TOGGLE. Effect 1 Selector, FX Unit Mode Selector, Knob 1, 2, 3: All of these under Interaction Mode, need to be set to, DIRECT. Button Options: For knobs, we’re actually controlling these with just a Button so we need to pre-set the value that the knob would typically be able to turn/adjust too. These are what I use, once you’ve got your echo freeze setup, you can tweak it to something a bit more custom of your like. Knob 1, 2, 3: Set these two 0.700 Wet/Dry Adjust: Set this to 0.500 Effect 1 Selector: This sets the effect bank for your button. For this, find Button Options > Set Value > Pick “Delay” in the drop down. FX Unit Mode Selector: This sets the effect bank to only use 1 effect at a time. For this, find, Button Options > Set Value > Pick “SINGLE ” in the drop down. If you want your button to light up! The last thing you’ll want to do if you want your button to actually light up when it’s engaged. It’s programming an OUT command to your list. For this, first find your FX Unit 1 On in the Assignment Table, Click it so it’s highlighted, then click “Add Out,” and at the top you’ll see FX Unit 1 On is already an option at the top. Click it, click LEARN, and address your button, then just make sure set everything you looks like what you see in this screenshot: That’s it! Drop a track in and test out your Echo Freeze and see if it works. Troubleshooting Tip: Depending on the type of action of your button on your MIDI controller, your button will either allow Traktor to tell the controller how to work, or like with devices like the Midi Fighter or Machine, you can change how the button functions inside a controller editor outside of Traktor. The two functions of a button are either Toggle or Hold. Toggle makes the button turn on or off with each press. Hold requires you to hold the button to make the effect happen and immediately upon release, it turns off. If you click “hold” as your interaction mode inside Traktor and it reacts more like a “Toggle,” it might be the controller itself needs to be changed in its proprietary controller editor. Some older controllers that can be addressed to MIDI might have these functions preset into the unit’s firmware and cannot be changed. Just understand that sometimes with some controllers, you’ll have use toggle or hold inside Traktor to get it to react the way you want, or you may have to take some added steps outside of Traktor to get everything functioning the way you want. Censor Button Let’s get all the commands we need to make this effect work as a “one-button” effect. This list is a little shorter than the last one. Go to Add In and select the following: Mixer > FX Unit 1 On (Select FX Unit 2 On for Deck FX Unit > Dry/Wet Adjust FX Unit > Knob 1 FX Unit > Knob 2 FX Unit > Knob 3 FX Unit > Effect 1 Selector FX Unit > FX Unit Mode Selector To map your button, again, click on your first command in the line (FX Unit 1 On) click LEARN, You should see the button’s MIDI address appear to the right. Do this again for every single command for the effect. Once you’ve mapped your button you need to change the Type of Controller to BUTTON Assignment: The Assignment buttons should be set to the following FX Unit 1 ON – Assignment to: Deck A (or Deck Everything else – Assignment to: FX Unit 1 FX Unit 1 On: All of these under Interaction Mode, need to be set to HOLD. Effect 1 Selector, FX Unit Mode Selector, Knob 1, 2, 3: All of these under Interaction Mode, need to be set to DIRECT. Button Options: This time, we’ll be very specific as we want the beat of the Censor to match the BPM of the songs, as well as the effect to drown out the track so you can’t hear the “Naughty” words you’re covering up. Knob 1: 0.500 Knob 2: 1.000 Knob 3: 0.900 Wet/Dry Adjust: 0.700 Effect 1 Selector: This sets your desired effect for your button. For this, find, Button Options > Set Value > Pick “Beatmasher 2 ” in the drop down. FX Unit Mode Selector: This sets the effect bank to only use 1 effect at a time. For this, find, Button Options > Set Value > Pick “SINGLE ” in the drop down. Again, to get your button to light up when being pressed, find your FX Unit 1 On in the Assignment Table, Click it so it’s highlighted, then click “Add Out,” and at the top you’ll see FX Unit 1 On is already an option at the top. Click it, click LEARN and address your button, then just make sure set everything you looks like what you see in this screenshot. Now test it out! The action of this button should be only functional when you’re holding the button down. Once your release it, you should hear your song playing like normal. Just remember, you need to hit the censor button just before the curse word, otherwise you’ll just be beatmashing a F-bomb, which really, could be kinda funny. Troubleshooting Tip: One quirk I’ve found on a few of my controllers is the effect doesn’t always instantly change when you hit the button if I’ve been using my echo freeze before. In cases like this, If you know you’re going to be using your Censor Button, give it a quick tap, it will switch your desired effect in the bank, and then when it comes to “bleep” out that explicit, your button will work as desired. Loop Active For mobile gigs, I’ve found this super handy at weddings during introductions when the couples want a certain song playing as the whole group is introduced, but they want to be introduced at a very specific part of the song. Think the build up before the main chorus of “I Gotta Feeling,” by the Black Eyed Peas or “Firework” by Katy Perry. The thing is, introductions are long, you’re fumbling with a mic, with a list of names, and you really don’t have time to worry about resetting a cue point, or trying to time the start of a preset loop where it doesn’t sound like a train wreck. With the Loop Active button, you can go ahead and set a loop into your cue bank like normal, then start the song at the beginning, hit your loop active button, and once the playhead reached your loop (just before the big drop) it will start the loop, and now you have a loop that will let you get through all the other, less important names, for when you get to the last couple (usually the bride and groom), you can deactivate your 4, 8, 16 bar loop, and the song will continue to the build up just as you announce the most important people of the night. Even if you’re off by a few seconds, it will sound pretty dang streamline. Moving on to the mapping part, this one is super easy: For the Add In: Deck Command > Loop > Loop Active On (you’ll want to do this twice so you have one for Deck For the Add Out so your button LED lights up Deck Command > Loop > Loop Active On Click LEARN, push the button you want to map, boom. Make sure your Mapping Details have the following. Type of Controller: Button Interaction Mode: Toggle Assignment: Deck A or B (or C or D) You’re done. Cue a 4 or 8 bar loop somewhere before a chorus a track, start it at the beginning, then hit your Loop Active button and see if it works property. Before you even get to the loop, you should already see the ACTIVE light on your screen lit up, telling you, that once the playhead reaches it’s first saved cued loop, it will activate your loop! Keylock On/Off The Keylock On (Preserve Pitch) is more of a fun effect for playing around and being creative. It allows you to turn on or off Key Lock so if you adjust the tempo, the pitch bends as the track slows up or down. Old school meets new school! Instructions are as followed. For the Add In: Track Deck > keylock On (Preserve Pitch) (do it twice so you have one for Deck For the Add Out so your button LED lights up: Track Deck > keylock On Click LEARN, push the button you want to map, boom. Make sure your Mapping Details have the following. Type of Controller: Button Interaction Mode: Toggle Assignment: Deck A or B (or C or D) Now, load up a track and test everything out! SOURCE
  33. 1 point
    Pioneer DJ has released a brand new public beta version of Rekordbox 5.4.4 with a wild new feature: track analysis data sharing. The new functionality aims to reduce the overall amount of time that users spend analyzing their music by allowing them to instead download the data from a server. Keep reading for the details so far on this new beta. Rekordbox 5.4.4 Beta’s New Analysis Sharing The popup changelog in the Rekordbox 5.4.4 beta “Let’s share track analysis data for better DJ life!” is probably one of the most hilarious-sounding change log notes I’ve ever read in a DJ software update, but Pioneer DJ really wants users to use this functionality. Essentially, with this new beta, all track analysis data is uploaded to Pioneer DJ’s servers and shared with other users. “The more tracks you analyze, the more users can experience faster track analysis!” Ultimately, this feature has been introduced to create value for Pioneer DJ in the long run. The release notes for this new version make it pretty clear what their goal is: to increase the value of their subscription plans by making this a feature that only paid users get. “We are planning to include this feature in the subscription plan in the future.” How Does It Work? According to the moderators over at the Pioneer DJ forums, here’s how the system will work. As you analyze a song, Rekordbox will “first check to see if a fingerprint of your song already exists in the database, then it will match it and download the analysis file instead of generating it.” If it doesn’t match a fingerprint in the database, it will upload the beatgrid and analysis metadata (apparently not cue points, loops, etc) to Pioneer DJ’s servers for others to use. Right now it’s very much a black box that performs in an unknown way – and so far in my testing, I haven’t been able to get a track to download analysis info (let me know in the comments if you’re able to). This has made it pretty hard to tell what users will get from this functionality. There are a few big open questions that Pioneer DJ hasn’t publicly released the details to, so we’ve sent them over to them and are waiting on official comment. Will Pioneer DJ servers only use one computer’s analysis data for a track, or will it “double-check” the data from multiple sources to make sure it is consistent? How much faster can downloading a track analysis file be versus actually analyzing songs? How will the servers ensure that the data is correct in the event that slightly different tracks with identical tag metadata are uploaded to the server? If re-analyzing a song that already has cues, loops, and other ‘personal’ metadata, will that be shared as well? In the final release, will DJs be able to disable track analysis sharing – especially if they aren’t getting the results back unless they pay for a subscription? How Can Users Turn This Off? While this is just a beta, there is a mildly controversial aspect to it: there’s no way to turn this track analysis data off in the preferences. This means any user who uses this beta is giving Pioneer DJ their beatgrid analysis results. How Can I Try This Out? To try out the feature, you’ll need to download the public beta of Rekordbox, which is available here on Pioneer DJ’s official forums. Important note: This could have a serious impact on your library and collection, so make sure you back it up first before installing the Beta. In Rekordbox, got to File > Library > Backup Library to make sure you’ve got a solid backup. SOURCE
  34. 1 point
    Cupe

    What's the best Pioneer DJ CDJ/XDJ for you?

    Pioneer DJ continues to dominate the market when it comes to standalone rigs. Yes, Denon DJ has made bold challenges that deserve recognition, but for now, most club DJ booths in the world will have some form of CDJ in them. If you’re looking to get the right DJ gear to emulate the club experience, the question is: which CDJ or XDJ is right for you? There continue to be many good reasons to invest in a DJ controller (paired with a computer) instead of a standalone system like CDJs – so this article doesn’t have the answers for everyone. Instead, we’re taking a closer look at the many pieces of Pioneer DJ’s hardware lineup that allow DJs to play tracks without a computer, as so many touring and industry professional artists do every single night all around the world. Do you really need to shell out all that money for a high-end NXS2 setup? Are you better off investing in the all-in-one XDJ-RX2? Keep reading for our best advice for your investment. Why Only Pioneer DJ Gear? Like it or not, Pioneer DJ has a bit of a lockout on our industry. Based on sales reports, it’s easily the top-selling brand in almost every category they enter. Yes, there are offerings from Gemini DJ, Denon DJ, Numark, all of which offer a similar-but-different experience from the CDJ ecosystem – but for now, you’re not likely to encounter those in a venue unless you’ve asked for them. Practicing and preparing on Pioneer DJ gear gives you the best odds of being able to play in a typical DJ booth with an installed system – so that’s what this guide focuses on. XDJ vs CDJ Before we work through every model, it’s important to note that Pioneer DJ standalone gear is divided into two name prefixes (XDJ or CDJ), but three groups by style: CDJ players: standalone media players that have CD drives, USB slots XDJ players: standalone media players like CDJs, but without CD drives XDJ all-in-ones: dual-deck media players with built in mixers (no CD drives on these either) Below, we’ve collected our advice on each model Pioneer DJ offers – ordered starting with the gear we think will be best for most DJs and working our way to the more rare choices. XDJ-RX2: The Most Sensible Purchase? Current Price: $1,699 in the DJTT store Release Date: September 2017 Best For: DJs looking to get the full two-deck NXS2 experience Without a doubt, the XDJ-RX2 is the best way to practice on a Rekordbox setup without investing in three different pieces of hardware (two media players and a mixer). It has many of the best features from the NXS2 lineup, including the browsing experience, a touchscreen display, track filtering, short cuts, Sound Color FX with a parameter knob, and most of the same Beat FX as on the DJM-900NXS2. Having these features in one package represents the best bang for your buck on the market – if you were to try to get something comparable with individual units, you’d spend well over $2,500. The XDJ-RX2 in some ways outclasses even a CDJ/DJM NXS2 setup – you’re able to record your mixes directly to your USB, there are parallel waveforms, and the 16 performance pads below the jogwheels allow for quick beatjumping, looping, slip looping, and hot cue triggering. No CDJ has this type of pad-based control Transitioning over to another Pioneer DJ rig (like a full NXS2 setup) is fairly simple when coming from an XDJ-RX2, with the biggest challenge being adjusting to two disparate displays (one per deck) instead of just one. XDJ-1000MK2: Digital Decks Current Price: $1,199 on DJTT store Release Date: August 2016 Best For: CDJ-style practice for DJs who don’t care about CDs In 2016, Pioneer DJ released a new version of the XDJ-1000, a USB-only player. The new MK2 model updated the browsing/onscreen experience to reflect the NXS2 style, with track filter and short cut features easily accessible. The other big difference is the MK2 has support for FLAC/ALAC files and offers a digital out on the back of the unit, making it more suitable for club installs. One important thing to consider with the XDJ-1000MK2 versus a CDJ-2000NXS2 is that many of the controls are on the touchscreen. For example, if you want to double/halve a loop length, the only way to do it is by tapping the screen – on CDJs, there are dedicated physical buttons for this. Same with Slip Mode, Cue Point setting/calling, and Sync/Master controls. The XDJ-1000MK2 also makes for great third/fourth decks for DJs looking to expand beyond just two CDJs. They’re easily linkable and syncable with the other models (except XDJ-RX/RX2s). One major drawback for many digital DJs is the lack of HID support on Traktor and Serato. This means you can’t use an XDJ-1000MK2 to natively control decks in these softwares, which is a frustrating way to get DJs to buy a higher end device (or, amusingly, an original XDJ-1000, which does offer HID support) or jump to Rekordbox DJ’s performance mode. CDJ-2000NXS2: Industry Standard Current Price: $2,199 in the DJTT store Release Date: February 2016 Best For: DJs who want an identical set of decks as what most clubs will have The CDJ-2000NXS2 is easily the most common club install deck out of Pioneer DJ’s full lineup. It’s the standard that other digital DJ players are compared to. If you’re a DJ who wants the exact same setup as what you’ll experience in a club situation, buy a pair of these. They’re likely to stay the standard for at least 2-3 years. One of the big changes on the NXS2 unit versus the older CDJ-2000NXS is a focus on sound quality – there’s now support for FLAC/ALAC, a better digital output, a separate power supply, and a 96kHz/24-bit sound card. This has largely assuaged many complaints that sound technicians had about the original CDJ-2000NXSs. Compared to the XDJ line, the jogwheels are also a bit higher quality – and have a heft to them that you won’t get on most other units aside from the TOUR1 model. The biggest obstacle for most DJs looking at buying CDJ-2000NXS2s is price. At just over two grand each, these are hefty investments – and that’s before you even start looking at mixer prices. A full NXS2 rig runs over $6k. XDJ-RR: The New Budget All-In-One Current Price: $1,099 on the DJTT store Release Date: October 2018 Best For: Budget-sensitive DJs who want an all-in-one Rekordbox unit Instead of releasing a higher-end, four deck all-in-one unit, Pioneer DJ decided to make their most recent product announcement a budget XDJ-RR. It has almost everything that the XDJ-RX2 has, but with a few features picked away from it, including a number of effects controls. Read more about the unit in our announcement article from earlier this month – but suffice to say we’re not convinced on the unit yet. In all honesty, many DJs would be better off spending the additional $600 and getting an RX2 instead of the RR. Getting the full array of Pioneer DJ effects controls are well worth it alone – not to mention the booth output and more performance pads. CDJ-TOUR1: Beautiful Excess Current Price: $4,999 on the DJTT store Release Date: May 2016 Best For: Festival DJ setups In the world of big-name DJs who tour the world, playing gigs for over $10,000 each, there’s a demand for very high-end gear. Pioneer DJ created a higher echelon of their CDJ line specifically to appeal to festivals, where DJs often have front of house engineers and are playing on multi-million dollar soundsystems. On the DJ side of things, the controls are almost identical to a CDJ-2000NXS2. Sure, there’s a large 13-inch touch screen attached to the top of the unit that allows for advanced browsing and multi-waveform views from up to four CDJs concurrently. But that aside, the big differences on the CDJ-TOUR1 is inside the unit. There’s a 32-bit D/A converter that allows for “incredibly low noise and distortion, even at the super-high volumes needed for large-scale events.” Beyond that, it’s about a full system – read more about why the TOUR1 system matters to festival DJs + sound techs. The CDJ-TOUR1 also has been ruggedized, with isolation feet, locking ethernet ports, and reinforced sides. The unit has been specifically designed to survive and thrive in even the most extreme festival conditions, but probably isn’t necessary for any home DJ setups. XDJ-700: Likely To Be Updated Soon? Current Price: $699 in the DJTT store Release Date: December 2015 Best For: Extreme budget DJs looking for individual decks Think of the XDJ-700 as a micro-sized XDJ-1000 – they are incredibly compact and efficient. The unit is just 10 inches wide, and carries many of the same features as the other players in this article. That said, almost all the controls are confined to the touchscreen – don’t expect to have a lot of the physical control that you might find on other units. Another challenge for many DJs is the non-standard power port on the back of the XDJ-700. Don’t expect to be able to use an IEC cable (like every other unit in this guide) – you’ll need to keep track of a 12V power brick to use with these players. It’s also important to point out the XDJ-700’s age. Even though the price is incredibly reasonable, the three-year old device is likely to see an update soon, at the very least to bring the browsing and onscreen experience in line with the NXS2 style. Buying Tips For CDJs / XDJs When starting to hunt for deals on these models, it can be a bit overwhelming to keep track of prices and bonus offers. One of the best things you can do is talk to a real person – in our own DJTT store, we have a support staff of real DJs who will help you choose the right model and get a good price or secret discount. Chat with them now and get a deal on your next Pioneer DJ purchase. Pioneer DJ gear also tends to hold value fairly well even when used, particularly the more common club install models. This means that when your’e ready to upgrade or change your setup, as long as you’ve kept your gear in good condition, you’re likely to get a fair amount of your investment back. For example, recently sold listings on eBay show that used CDJ-2000NXSs (released in 2012) regularly still sell for $1,000 – $1,800. If you’re going to buy used gear, we highly recommend using eBay (look for sellers with good reputations) or even better, buying locally (and get a chance to test the gear before you spend your money). Bottom Line Recommendations: Most DJs can’t go wrong with an XDJ-RX2 to get the full features of a NXS2 rig without the price If you need more than two decks, consider the XDJ-1000MK2s – but not if you need HID support CDJ-2000NXS2s are great if you’re running a club or renting your gear out regularly and can recoop the heavy cost The TOUR1 is probably too costly for almost everyone except major festivals. SOURCE
  35. 1 point
    hardwarepimp

    UK Hard Dance / Techno

    Hi there party people, Here's a track I knocked out recently: https://soundcloud.com/hardwarepimp/big-fat-bass Feedback welcomed. Enjoy!
  36. 1 point
    hardwarepimp

    UK Hard Dance / Techno

    Thanks Cupe! I'm new here and think I messed it up - so appreciate y'all
  37. 1 point
    Scottie

    Cupe needs a new PC build

    didn't you buy a new 650w psu recently? That'll be plenty for this build even with a million drives and upgrading cpu/gpu in a couple years. https://au.pcpartpicker.com/list/x3wWP3 - just over $1.1k with a new psu, but under 1k without. Cpu is about $20 cheaper compared to scorptec, this uses the less fast ram but is $70 cheaper than scorptec's price, motherboard is $10 cheaper. Cpu cooler isn't 100% needed because the stock one for AMD is okay, but the one in the parts list will be pretty much silent and keep your shit cooler
  38. 1 point
    AStro2230

    Kaytranada Boiler room set

    Hi ive recently gotten into the fine art that is being a dj. recently i was watching(on youtube) kaytranada play a set in Montreal, he had a small set of decks and i was wondering if anybody on this forum knew what they were. Any help would be appreciated as i am wanting to buy them for their ease of getting around with. the gear he is using can be seen within the first 10 seconds of the video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-5EQIiabJvk&t=1087s
  39. 1 point
    zed

    Introduction + Rekt Network Radio Platform

    Hello Everyone, I stumbled onto this forum/community via a tweet like and, being an Australian myself, thought I might post some details about my platform. I run a completely custom 24/7, ad-free, online radio platform, with live DJs, multiple stations, 320kbps streams in multiple formats and some bleeding edge web technology. Served by multiple geo-located front-ends, distributed worldwide to give DJs the shortest possible up-link path (There's a front-end in Sydney) On request I offer an 'open mic' to anyone who would like to stream live and would love to extend that offer to anyone here that's interested. We mostly focus on electronic music, with genre's that include Dubstep (real dubstep), DnB, Synthwave, Lofi & Chill, 30's Reefer Jazz (Fallout style) Also, we have a few electronic producers who make some amazing originals, some who showcase their new work live, and plenty of tech nerds discussing various topics in the IRC (custom webchat on the site) Check us out at https://rekt.network and jump in the chat there, msg me here or email me at z@rekt.network Here is also an example 1hr dubstep set that I made for a youtuber who posts mixes for programming to. I hand coded everything down to the radio scripts and provide the platform entirely at my own cost aided it part by a few generous donors. For the love of music Regards, Z
  40. 1 point
    Scottie

    Cupe needs a new PC build

    you could salvage your psu, graphics card, fans and case. If you're upgrading to a new cpu, then there's no avoiding having to get a new motherboard and new ram too
  41. 1 point
    Scottie

    Cupe needs a new PC build

    case: https://www.scorptec.com.au/product/Cases/ATX/57222-FD-CA-DEF-R5-BK 8 internal hdd bays cpu: https://www.scorptec.com.au/product/CPU/AMD-Socket-AM4/71983-YD2600BBAFBOX intel is a scam atm, for your budget the best you could get is a i5 8400, this gets you double the threads and negligible loss in performance in intel biased shit motherboard: https://www.scorptec.com.au/product/Motherboards/AMD-Socket-AM4/72450-X470-GAMING-PLUS - cheapest out of the box motherboard available atm, otherwise you can wait til end of the month when cheaper boards are out and out of the box compatible, or get this https://www.scorptec.com.au/product/Motherboards/AMD-Socket-AM4/67486-GA-AB350-Gaming-3 which would require you to get in contact with the scorptec guys to update the bios before they ship it out to you. Saves you $85, the more expensive one is better but not really $85 better for you ram: https://www.scorptec.com.au/product/Memory/DDR4/65348-HX432C16PB3K2-16 ram prices are a fucking scam right now, this is a pretty decent price for 16gb of good ram. Alternatively, you could go for https://www.scorptec.com.au/product/Memory/DDR4/67740-F4-3200C14D-16GFX which is more expensive but higher quality, but probably not worth the extra money for your use case. All up this should come to just under 1k, maybe a little over if you get the more expensive motherboard AND more expensive ram.
  42. 1 point
    Taken from Pioneer DJ forums Disclaimer: do the following at your own risk. All care is taken, yet myself or ADJF will not be held accountable if you're a dumb noob that accidently deletes his (or her) rekordbox database. 1) This method only works PC/PC or Mac/Mac, it WILL NOT WORK for mixed OS's simply because of the difference in how each operating system indexes files. This guide will also assume that you have your music files located in the same location on each computer. It doesn't matter if that's on an external drive or an internal folder, it must have the same name / folder / location on BOTH COMPUTERS or your files will show up as "not found". If you need assistance with this, please ask BEFORE completing the steps below. 2) Install Rekordbox on each computer. If you already have it installed, great. You'll have to pick one of them to be the "master" for the start of this project. Run Rekordbox at least once if it's a fresh install. 3) Install Dropbox on each computer. You can place the "My Dropbox" folder anywhere you want. Yes, anywhere. I suggest under My Documents (Windows) or under your Home directory (Mac) so it's easy to locate later. 4) Step four is broken into Windows / Mac, please read the appropriate sections below and we'll meet back together at step five. Windows 4a) You'll need to create symbolic links between the old Pioneer directory and thankfully, there's a utility to do it with. Do this on your SLAVE computer first, not the one with your MASTER database or it will be overwritten later. Go and grab Directory Linker. The program is self-executable so no installation is required. 4b) Running the program gives you this screen: The settings shown above are for an XP installation, here are your file locations based on your OS: XP: C:\Documents and Settings\YourUsername\Application Data\Pioneer Vista: C:\Users\YourUsername\AppData\Roaming\Pioneer 7: C:\Users\YourUsername\AppData\Roaming\Pioneer Clicking the folder button to the right of the field will allow you to browse for that folder, but if you don't have your hidden files visible, you may not be able to locate them so typing them in directly is an alternative to enabling the hidden files. Be sure to replace YourUsername with the user name for your current profile. Note that the destination is ...\My Documents\My Dropbox (or whatever you called it or placed it) >> DO NOT add \Pioneer to the end or it will not work. Ensure "Copy contents..." is ticked and click "Go!". It will now move your Pioneer folder into your Dropbox. 4c) Repeat step 4b as above for your MASTER computer EXCEPT! when you get to the last line above, add a check to the box "Overwrite Target Files", this will now copy your master Rekordbox database into the Dropbox folder. Mac 4a) You don't need a 3rd party app (well, technically Windows doesn't either, it's just easier with a GUI), just fire up Terminal from your applications folder. Do this on your SLAVE computer first, not the one with your MASTER database or it will be overwritten later. 4b) Type the following in Terminal: ln -s ~/Library/Pioneer ~/Dropbox (yes, that's an LN at the start) If you happen to use any folder names that have spaces (like My Dropbox), you need to put quotation marks around that thing, for example: "~/My Dropbox" 4c) Do the same on your Master computer. You thought there was more? Nope. 5) Let Dropbox do its magic from your MASTER computer and once it's sync'd the files, move to your SLAVE computer and open Rekordbox. As noted below in the Caveats, you should see Rekordbox asking for your license key. If this happens, you're part-way to knowing it worked. After you re-enter your key, Rekordbox should show your collection of files. (If Rekordbox asks you for your key EVERY time, on a PC, you'll need to try running it as administrator, on a Mac, you may need to try locking your licence file. If you need help with this - just ask!) 6) There is NO NEED to change the location of your track analysis files within Rekordbox. It should remain default; if you ever changed it or plan on changing it, this system will no longer work as intended and you're on your own for that! Caveats I haven't verified this on Mac, but I'll assume it's the same ... Windows hates that you updated your license key file so it will tell you the key is invalid and to enter it again EVERY time you open the program. I have not found a way around this, the easiest solution is to keep a text file on-hand and copy/paste any time you run the program. I know it may seem like a nuisance, but I will remind you that you're now doing a seamless sync of your Rekordbox database between two computers (something it wasn't designed for), so suck it up. You could go to the hassle of linking individual files but the problem there is if you don't link the folder, any new files created within will not be linked ... and trouble will ensue. Don't run both copies of Rekordbox at the same time. They will create a conflict with the database as they'll each try to change the file on Dropbox and you'll just ask for problems. Don't open Rekordbox on your computer until after Dropbox has synchronised the files from your last use on the other computer. If you open it before the sync is completed, you'll open it with an old file and risk wiping any changes you made.
This leaderboard is set to Melbourne/GMT+10:00



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