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LabRat

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  1. Upvote
    LabRat got a reaction from Cupe in Checking in! Trying to revive my passion.   
    Welcome back stranger! All the best - I'm still here to help you along the way
  2. Like
    LabRat reacted to SolDios in Checking in! Trying to revive my passion.   
    Hello All!

    It's been a while since I've posted so I thought I'd check in again. 
    Have been out of the industry for 2 or so years, got fed up with doing weddings and kissing promoters asses to get the smallest of club gigs. I brought some new equipment to try doing it as a passion, but I was just so burnt out at that point that I just couldn't enjoy mixing anymore.

    Fast forward 2 years and here we are, those 900's I brought are still untouched but I can't bring myself to sell them. So I'm having one last crack at revitalizing my desire to DJ.
    As a side note, I also do photography for a local radio station for their events. No cash for em only drink cards, but that's how I want it to there is no pressure if I fuck up.

    Currently my goals are the following:
    Move my Rekordbox library to my Surface Pro which I take to work everyday to find songs on my train ride home. Submit a Mini mix to my local radio station. Do some Twitch streams of me DJ'ing on Friday nights with some beers in hand. Short of this not happening, I will sell my decks and put it to bed. Can't bring myself to sell my PA or Sub though!

    My Gear:
    https://drive.google.com/open?id=18Mp2S1M4gCP7a3OS4CG6ZTkpeL4D8eQL

    My Flickr Account:
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/135142707@N06/
     
  3. Like
    LabRat reacted to Cupe in Checking in! Trying to revive my passion.   
    Don't let the dream die. You were a major part of ADJF and showed everyone how you can push through pressure and make something of yourself.
    One of the toughest dudes in ADJF history and I'm glad you're still around mate.
    Get a mix happening!
  4. Upvote
    LabRat reacted to Cupe in A Beginner’s Guide To Audio Cables   
    It might be a bit terrifying to older DJs, but many new DJs don’t know anything about audio cables, wiring, and pre-amps. In today’s article, guest contributor DJ Soo shares a back-to-basics guide on audio cables. This is essential reading for every new DJ – pass it along and share your own must-know knowledge in the comments.
    Why Do Most New DJs Not Know About Audio Cables?
    For decades, stereo systems were largely component-based gear requiring a certain level of knowledge and understanding to get home hi-fi systems up and running, with various components sending signal to each other. There were separate amplifiers, turntables, CD players, cassette decks, etc – and each had to connect to one another to get sound to the speakers.
    Wiring a hi-fi system is a skill of the past.
    In the last 20 years or so, the way we listen to music has drastically changed. The home stereo is no longer the source of music. Computers and phones are how most people consume their music, and the industry has focused on creating technology devoted specifically to them. Most home audio setups rarely need more than a 1/8”  cable, USB cable, phone dock, or a Bluetooth connection.
    DJing and PA systems on the other hand, still remain firmly entrenched in a more traditional use of audio cables to connect various components and there may be many younger DJs that are not fully familiar with the various types of cables available and how each functions.
    So with that said, here’s a beginner’s guide to the different types of audio cables you’re likely to meet as a DJ.
    Editor’s Note: Many of these concepts might be obvious to most veteran DJs – but they are all included here to act as a comprehensive guide. 
    Signal Flow
    The inputs and outputs on a DJM-900NXS
    The first thing to understand about audio is that it is very linear. There is generally either an output or an input. When it comes to audio connections, Output refers to the sound coming out of those ports, while Input refers to ports that receive that sound. This is what is known as “signal flow” or “signal chain.” Outputs should be connected to inputs along the chain of devices.
    For instance, when connecting a device like a CDJ or controller to a DJ Mixer, you want the CDJ outputs sending audio to your mixer inputs for their respective channels. On a standard DJ mixer, your MASTER, BOOTH, and REC OUT will be your outputs while your channel ports will be your inputs.
    Left/Right
    Audio cables are often colored red and white to easily track which side is connected to which channel.
    This one is fairly obvious – the tracks you DJ with are almost always produced in a stereo field. This means the signals for the left and right speakers differ. In most audio gear, that means separate ports and cables are required for the left and right side of the signal.
    Traditionally, the right side port will be colored red, while the left side will be white or black. The coloring on the cables makes no functional difference – they’re just an easy guide to keep track of where things are plugged in.  
    Male/Female Connectors + Plugs

    The terms “Male” and “Female” in regards to cables and ports refers to the type of connectors of the cables. Male connectors plug into things, while Female connectors have things plugged into them. I’ll let you figure out where the terms originated from.
    Most cables used in DJing will have male ends on each side, with the female connections as the ports on the hardware. With XLR cables (more on them below), there’s almost always a male and female end, with outputs on hardware almost always being male and inputs almost always being female.
    Balanced/Unbalanced
    There’s a wealth of technical reasons and descriptions differentiating Balanced and Unbalanced cables using such jargon as “differential,” “reversed polarity,” “phase cancellation,” and so on, but instead of getting into that, let’s stick to the practical application – the most important thing for DJs to know:
    Unbalanced cables tend to be more prone to interference and added noise once getting beyond a certain length (about 15-20 feet) Balanced cables tend to have less noise and allow for longer cables In order to use balanced cables, the hardware must also have balanced outputs. This will be labeled on the gear. If you have to use long cables, you should always try to use balanced cables and outputs!
    Of the most widely used cables:
    RCA is always Unbalanced XLR is always Balanced 1/4” can either be Balanced (TRS) or Unbalanced (TS) Here’s a great quick explanation of the two concepts on YouTube by Joe Gilder:
     
    Pre-amps
    Amplifiers do pretty much what the name states:  it amplifies power and in the case of audio, the volume. Audio output from computers, CDJs, phones, and other non-analog devices is what’s known as line level audio. This is a specific range of volume output by devices.
    There are, however, certain devices that output considerably quieter or weaker signals that require an extra stage of amplification to output at a similar volume. The two most commonly encountered pieces of gear for DJs will be turntables and microphones.
    The inputs on a DJ mixer often have selectable phono preamp or line level inputs – like on the back of this Rane Sixty Two
    DJ turntables require what’s known as a phono pre-amp to get vinyl at a similar volume level as a CDJ or controller. Almost all DJ mixers will have built-in pre-amps, and some of the more modern turntable options also have built-in pre-amps.
    Phono inputs on DJ mixers are specifically for turntables and nothing else as they have a specific layer of EQing required to make vinyl sound like real music (known as the RIAA EQ curve). If you’ve ever plugged in a turntable into the Line input of a mixer and heard a quiet signal or worse, or plugged a CDJ into the Phono input and heard a loud, distorted mess of a signal, it’s because of the pre-amp (or lack thereof).
    Microphones also require a pre-amp as passive mics also tend to be very weak compared to line level sound. Most line or front-of-house mixers have both line level and mic level inputs that can be plugged into. Unlike phono pre-amps, the input does not alter the sound outside of amplification so it is possible to plug a line level output into a mic input and drastically lower the gain to prevent clipping.  Some mixers will also have what’s known as a “pad” option which automatically adjusts down the level by about 20 db essentially converting the input into a line level input.
    Audio Cable Types
    RCA Cables
     

    RCA is one of the most ubiquitous cable formats in audio gear. Developed in the 1940s, it has remained largely unchanged since and continues to be one of the standard cables for linking audio components. This cable is used for everything from CDJs to mixers to main outputs to stereo systems.
    Due to the unbalanced nature of RCA cables, they are best used for shorter distances. This is fine connecting a CDJ to a mixer or a controller to a mixer, but for entry-level mixers and controllers that only have RCA outputs for the mains, it isn’t recommended to connect directly to a PA system if the cables are going to be longer than 15-20 feet just due to the increased risk of noise and interference.
    RCA cables can also be used for S/PDIF or Digital Outputs although a specific cable (75ohm cable) is supposed to give the best results. This is most commonly seen in higher end Pioneer CDJs and Nexus mixers.
    TRS / TS Cables

    TRS stands for Tip Ring Sleeve which is another ubiquitous cable format alongside TS which is simply Tip Sleeve. The most commonly seen usage of the TRS connector is the 1/8” or 1/4” jack used in headphones. These cables are also used as PA Speaker cables, microphones, and instrument patch cables. Outside of headphones, in the DJ world, they are often used as main outputs or booth outputs.
    The important thing to note: these cables can either be balanced or unbalanced. TRS cables are balanced while TS cables are unbalanced. The easy way to tell the cables apart is that TRS cables have an extra plastic ring around the jack rather than the single in a TS cable.
    XLR Cables

    XLR cables are one of the standard cable formats for pro audio. Unlike most audio cables, XLR will almost always have two different ends – one male and one female. XLR outputs and inputs are most commonly used for main outputs on mixers or higher end controllers or for microphones.
    XLR cables are popular in the pro audio world for a few of reasons:
    They are always balanced – it’s very easy to run long cables They lock into place – making it more difficult to get accidentally unplugged Due to the dual connector ends, it’s very easy to link up a series of shorter cables together for a longer run If you’re building up a mobile PA system, this will be the cable you will most likely use the most to connect speakers.
    SpeakOn Cables

     
    SpeakOn cables are most often used in higher end and larger PA systems – festival and concert rigs and the like. DJ gear does not use SpeakOn connectors – they’re used to connect amplifier racks to passive speaker rigs. The advantages to SpeakOn cables is the greater shielding to prevent interference or even electrical shock, more durable and thicker cables, and a superior locking mechanism.
    Newer passive speakers (i.e. requiring separate amplifiers) will often sport SpeakOn connectors vs XLR connectors on powered or active gear.
    Speaker Wire

    I’ve always hated speaker wire. It’s messy, ugly and hard to deal with. They were the standard for HiFi systems for decades. It’s essentially two raw bundles of small copper, wrapped in rubber, with the copper exposed on each end. This wire is used to connect an amplifier to passive speakers. If you’ve ever had to ground a Technics to a ground post with the grounding fork missing, connecting speaker wire is the same, but more of a pain.
    Speaker wire is essentially two wires melded together – a positive and negative side. The exposed wires are often twisted up and jammed into a clip connector or a binding post (similar to a grounding post). Some speakers will have special connectors you can attach to the wires to make it simpler.
    Bonus Concepts + Additional Notes
    Combo Jacks
    Combo jack Mic inputs on the back of a VCI-400
    Combo jacks are jacks that can take both XLR and 1/4” TRS/TS cables. They are always female so they always function as inputs.  These are most commonly found in active speakers.
    Adaptors
    There are times that certain pieces of gear require different connectors on each ends (for example, connecting a DDJ-SR – which only has 1/4” outs – to a pair speakers that only have XLR inputs). The easiest way to solve this is to use either adaptors or cables with different connectors on either end.
    Want to change cable types? There’s seemingly an adaptor for every possible situation.
    If you can think of a combination of connectors, then an adaptor or cable exists for it. While adaptors are convenient, I tend to gravitate towards dedicated cables (or in the case of XLR, they also function as adaptors – just with a length of wire between them).
    Adaptors can be bulky and in the case of some manufacturers of connectors, aren’t the most snug leading to signal loss or noise. Add to that, given that most DJ gear tends to plug in horizontally, heavier adaptors can stress the plugs – which can end up damaging your gear.
    Converting unbalanced to balanced signal
    If you have a mixer or controller which only has RCA or unbalanced 1/4” outputs and you want the option of running cables longer than 15 feet, there are a couple of ways to convert the signal to a balanced output.
    The first is a DI or Direct Box which is a small unit that is purpose-built to convert the signal into a balanced output. They come in different sizes and styles some which are very basic and others which have a host of more features. Best bet is to find one that supports stereo inputs and outputs, otherwise a pair of boxes will be required. The other option is to run the device into a separate mixer with balanced outputs. There are plenty of small-size and affordable mixers which accept RCA or 1/4” inputs and have balanced XLR or 1/4” outputs. The added benefit of these mixers is that it allows for an extra gain stage to boost volume. This is especially useful for entry-level devices that tend to have lower output. A DJ mixer will also function well for this application – so venues with any type of house mixer will work fine.
  5. Upvote
    LabRat got a reaction from Cupe in Denon DJ’s X1850 Mixer: An Aesthetic Refresh And That’s About It   
    I haven't seen Denon gear in so long. Almost a bit of a shame though because their stuff back in the day was bulletproof
  6. Like
    LabRat reacted to Mitch in Competition Ideas   
    Sounds intriguing!
     
  7. Upvote
    LabRat got a reaction from Mitch in Competition Ideas   
    Not sure if there was a thread anywhere but if anyone is up for a challenge I have some ideas. These are more directed at music makers rather than DJ's but everyone is welcome to give it a go. 
    The initial preset challenge
    This one is about using your creativity using nothing but the initial preset. Inside the plugin you can have control over the envelopes and filters but that's it. You're not allowed to chance the waveform. You can manipulate the sound any way you like using as many plugins as you like. The idea of this is to be as creative as you can by forcing you to use all those extra plugins you got that you may have shoved aside or just not used. It's a good way to understand how they work too. 
    One sample challenge
    I saw this on YouTube and loved the idea. We all have 1 sample, can be a section of an acapella, a song or some other random audio sample, and we call create a piece of music around that one sample. The idea is to obviously use the sample in as many different ways as you can, challenging your creativity.
    If anyone's interested we can organise a deadline and I can come up with some more detailed rules.   
  8. Like
    LabRat reacted to Cupe in Competition Ideas   
    I'd def be keen to do the One Sample challenge.
  9. Upvote
    LabRat got a reaction from Cupe in Competition Ideas   
    Not sure if there was a thread anywhere but if anyone is up for a challenge I have some ideas. These are more directed at music makers rather than DJ's but everyone is welcome to give it a go. 
    The initial preset challenge
    This one is about using your creativity using nothing but the initial preset. Inside the plugin you can have control over the envelopes and filters but that's it. You're not allowed to chance the waveform. You can manipulate the sound any way you like using as many plugins as you like. The idea of this is to be as creative as you can by forcing you to use all those extra plugins you got that you may have shoved aside or just not used. It's a good way to understand how they work too. 
    One sample challenge
    I saw this on YouTube and loved the idea. We all have 1 sample, can be a section of an acapella, a song or some other random audio sample, and we call create a piece of music around that one sample. The idea is to obviously use the sample in as many different ways as you can, challenging your creativity.
    If anyone's interested we can organise a deadline and I can come up with some more detailed rules.   
  10. Upvote
    LabRat got a reaction from Cupe in Any suggestions for good studios in Sydney?   
    I was remembering something with a 3 in it so I had a look. Apparently these guys aren't too bad so it could be worth a call
    https://studios301.com/recording-mixing/sydney/
  11. Upvote
    LabRat got a reaction from BeatLeSS in Submitting Music Independently to Streaming Platforms   
    This is a quick how-to submitting music to Spotify, Apple Music and other streaming and online music services. 
    Uploading music to streaming platforms or online music stores without a record label is quite simple. All you need is some 3rd party involvement, I guess commonly known as distributers. Most of these distribution services offer something slightly different. I'm not going to go through all of them and what they do, that's something you can do the research on but I'll put down links of a few of the commonly used ones.
    By submitting your music to these platforms, they take care or all the little business things the labels would have to do (paying royalties, licensing and monetisation, and above all else the distribution). The good thing about going independent is you take total control of your works and you retain 100% of your intellectual property rights, meaning you own everything which I feel is very important. Record labels take the IP rights from you making your music their asset. In exchange, they're supposed to invest in you as an artist but it can go either way. Whatever happens, whether you become famous or not, they still own your works for along as the contract states and if you were to part ways from the label you'll then need to seek permission to perform the music that you wrote. Artists big and small fall into this trap all the time. Kesha and Taylor Swift are prefect examples of artists struggling to claim royalties or performance licensing because of record labels refusing to cooperate. 
    Below are 3 commonly used services; 
    https://cdbaby.com
    CD Baby is a popular service that gets your music just about everywhere and they're a pay-as-you-go service. They have a bunch of stuff they can do for you like mastering and production of physical copies, CD's etc. As far as the royalties go, you get 91% paid to you.
    https://distrokid.com
    I use distrokid for my submissions. They're subscription based with a limited number of artists you can distribute under, so if you wanted to set up a little label I guess you could do that through distrokid and have up to 5 different artists. It's a super easy process to submit music and the dashboard is nice and clean to navigate so you can keep track of your releases and make changes to them whenever you like. Distrokid pay 100% of the royalties to you. They're currently beta testing submissions to Beatport so if that's going to be your primary source of output I'd suggest looking elsewhere.
    https://www.tunecore.com
    I think TuneCore is a pay-as-you-go service too and I believe you also collect 100% of the royalties. I haven't done too much research about whether they submit to Beatport so you'll have to have a look. It's not a service I looked too much into, even just scraping the surface of their website didn't tell me too much. 
    I know it's all super bland but everyone's needs are going to be different but hopefully the 3 above give you that little bit of a head start. There are many more that offer lots of different things.
    If anyone has any further questions I'll be happy to try assist where I can
  12. Like
    LabRat reacted to Cupe in Submitting Music Independently to Streaming Platforms   
    Ok cool. I might give it a shot soon.
  13. Upvote
    LabRat got a reaction from Cupe in Submitting Music Independently to Streaming Platforms   
    No worries. 
    This is why I chose to submit with distrokid using their subscription based service. For the cost per year (which is around 60-70 bucks) I can upload as many tracks as I like. If you choose not to renew, you can pay extra fees on your tracks so they'll remain on these stores for life, otherwise just keep subscribing. If you got a massive catalog of tunes it's really helpful to just keep uploading throughout the year. There's a few extra fees, like submitting to Shazam for example which is only a few bucks, but distrokid just makes it super easy (for me anyway) knowing you can log on, upload and 4 or 5 weeks later your track is released. It's recommended you give a minimum of 4 weeks notice too. Some stores take longer to submit to than others. 
  14. Like
    LabRat reacted to Mitch in Kouki - My Body (Radio Cut)   
    Comeback is in the works! Stay tuned for revival details.
  15. Upvote
    LabRat reacted to Cupe in Submitting Music Independently to Streaming Platforms   
    This is awesome, thanks for taking the time to write this up chief.
    Does it end up getting expensive for a heap of tracks?
  16. Upvote
    LabRat reacted to Mitch in Submitting Music Independently to Streaming Platforms   
    Brilliant article!
  17. Upvote
    LabRat got a reaction from Cupe in Submitting Music Independently to Streaming Platforms   
    This is a quick how-to submitting music to Spotify, Apple Music and other streaming and online music services. 
    Uploading music to streaming platforms or online music stores without a record label is quite simple. All you need is some 3rd party involvement, I guess commonly known as distributers. Most of these distribution services offer something slightly different. I'm not going to go through all of them and what they do, that's something you can do the research on but I'll put down links of a few of the commonly used ones.
    By submitting your music to these platforms, they take care or all the little business things the labels would have to do (paying royalties, licensing and monetisation, and above all else the distribution). The good thing about going independent is you take total control of your works and you retain 100% of your intellectual property rights, meaning you own everything which I feel is very important. Record labels take the IP rights from you making your music their asset. In exchange, they're supposed to invest in you as an artist but it can go either way. Whatever happens, whether you become famous or not, they still own your works for along as the contract states and if you were to part ways from the label you'll then need to seek permission to perform the music that you wrote. Artists big and small fall into this trap all the time. Kesha and Taylor Swift are prefect examples of artists struggling to claim royalties or performance licensing because of record labels refusing to cooperate. 
    Below are 3 commonly used services; 
    https://cdbaby.com
    CD Baby is a popular service that gets your music just about everywhere and they're a pay-as-you-go service. They have a bunch of stuff they can do for you like mastering and production of physical copies, CD's etc. As far as the royalties go, you get 91% paid to you.
    https://distrokid.com
    I use distrokid for my submissions. They're subscription based with a limited number of artists you can distribute under, so if you wanted to set up a little label I guess you could do that through distrokid and have up to 5 different artists. It's a super easy process to submit music and the dashboard is nice and clean to navigate so you can keep track of your releases and make changes to them whenever you like. Distrokid pay 100% of the royalties to you. They're currently beta testing submissions to Beatport so if that's going to be your primary source of output I'd suggest looking elsewhere.
    https://www.tunecore.com
    I think TuneCore is a pay-as-you-go service too and I believe you also collect 100% of the royalties. I haven't done too much research about whether they submit to Beatport so you'll have to have a look. It's not a service I looked too much into, even just scraping the surface of their website didn't tell me too much. 
    I know it's all super bland but everyone's needs are going to be different but hopefully the 3 above give you that little bit of a head start. There are many more that offer lots of different things.
    If anyone has any further questions I'll be happy to try assist where I can
  18. Upvote
    LabRat got a reaction from Mitch in Submitting Music Independently to Streaming Platforms   
    This is a quick how-to submitting music to Spotify, Apple Music and other streaming and online music services. 
    Uploading music to streaming platforms or online music stores without a record label is quite simple. All you need is some 3rd party involvement, I guess commonly known as distributers. Most of these distribution services offer something slightly different. I'm not going to go through all of them and what they do, that's something you can do the research on but I'll put down links of a few of the commonly used ones.
    By submitting your music to these platforms, they take care or all the little business things the labels would have to do (paying royalties, licensing and monetisation, and above all else the distribution). The good thing about going independent is you take total control of your works and you retain 100% of your intellectual property rights, meaning you own everything which I feel is very important. Record labels take the IP rights from you making your music their asset. In exchange, they're supposed to invest in you as an artist but it can go either way. Whatever happens, whether you become famous or not, they still own your works for along as the contract states and if you were to part ways from the label you'll then need to seek permission to perform the music that you wrote. Artists big and small fall into this trap all the time. Kesha and Taylor Swift are prefect examples of artists struggling to claim royalties or performance licensing because of record labels refusing to cooperate. 
    Below are 3 commonly used services; 
    https://cdbaby.com
    CD Baby is a popular service that gets your music just about everywhere and they're a pay-as-you-go service. They have a bunch of stuff they can do for you like mastering and production of physical copies, CD's etc. As far as the royalties go, you get 91% paid to you.
    https://distrokid.com
    I use distrokid for my submissions. They're subscription based with a limited number of artists you can distribute under, so if you wanted to set up a little label I guess you could do that through distrokid and have up to 5 different artists. It's a super easy process to submit music and the dashboard is nice and clean to navigate so you can keep track of your releases and make changes to them whenever you like. Distrokid pay 100% of the royalties to you. They're currently beta testing submissions to Beatport so if that's going to be your primary source of output I'd suggest looking elsewhere.
    https://www.tunecore.com
    I think TuneCore is a pay-as-you-go service too and I believe you also collect 100% of the royalties. I haven't done too much research about whether they submit to Beatport so you'll have to have a look. It's not a service I looked too much into, even just scraping the surface of their website didn't tell me too much. 
    I know it's all super bland but everyone's needs are going to be different but hopefully the 3 above give you that little bit of a head start. There are many more that offer lots of different things.
    If anyone has any further questions I'll be happy to try assist where I can
  19. Upvote
    LabRat got a reaction from Mitch in Kouki - My Body (Radio Cut)   
    I'll post a thread on a few different ways you can do it independantly
  20. Upvote
    LabRat got a reaction from Cupe in Kouki - My Body (Radio Cut)   
    I'll post a thread on a few different ways you can do it independantly
  21. Upvote
    LabRat got a reaction from Cupe in Kouki - My Body (Radio Cut)   
    Few different ways to do it but the easiest way now is to go though distribution platforms like Tunecore, Distrokid, CD Baby etc. It was a bit complicated to set up a proper label when I was going though those hoops with Trump'd (I was in the process of registering with Label Works) but since I scrapped that idea I'm only really putting my own music out I decided to use Distrokid. Some platforms, like Distrokid, don't upload to some places like Beatport so if you wanna put your music everywhere like that you just need to do the research to see which one works for you. They all take different percentages and have different fees too 
  22. Upvote
    LabRat got a reaction from Cupe in Kouki - My Body (Radio Cut)   
    New track is live on Spotify. Give it a like for  Might upload the club mix to Beatport in the coming weeks
    https://open.spotify.com/track/3oB4IyWdPFqOKv9Sln7OAo?si=LYffjWGFSpuRA-zsC5ddNQ
     
  23. Upvote
    LabRat got a reaction from OxyKon in Suggestions - Mac Pro Build   
    don't be like that
     
    ps- I use windows to run my vinyl cutter. there's nothing on it apart from the software and drivers purely to run the cutter and I've had more issues with that then I've ever had in the 14 years I've been using a Mac  
  24. Upvote
    LabRat got a reaction from OxyKon in Stanton ST150 Turntable Rebuild   
    Ladies, Gents and esteemed guests;
    I pulled my turntables out of storage the other week to find that after a year and a half of being tucked away, something ridiculous happened to all the plastics and rubber parts. I'm not sure what caused it but it became all sticky and gross. The base and all the buttons were stuffed. It's like that feeling when you pull off a sticker after a long time and all the adhesive is left behind.  
    I plugged them in to make sure they still work and so far so good but I didn't want to keep them in this condition. 
    After ringing around for parts and such it became increasingly difficult to find anyone who cared. I called the distributer and they said they may have some second hand bits laying around but no bueno so I decided to pull them apart and clean them up myself. Since they were going to be apart, I've decided that I'm going to wrap the faceplate and do the dicer mod!
    Quick Note - make sure you keep everything labeled! Take lots of photos and put any parts in labeled zip lock bags so the assembly is much easier
    Here's as they were when I pulled them out of storage
     
    You might be able to see the difference in the plastic. The shinier side is where I scrapped a bit of the adhesive off, and the matte is the gunk.

    So time to dismantle. There's next to no information about these online so it's a guessing game at the moment. The platter pops right off revealing a few screws. Since I'm wrapping the face plate I need to remove the screws (which I've already done around the platter) the other 4 are unnecessary.

    There's about 10 screws holding the base together. You can see by the finger prints how stuffed these are

    Once the screws are out, you can wiggle the base off. Try not to yank it when doing so. Be gentle, it'll come off

    I'm skipping a massive part here but can go int greater detail if requested. It's good to have an old pillow to rest the face plate down on as the hardness of a table could damage the tone arm, buttons or circuitry. To make a long story short, the tone arm isn't clipped in, it's straight wires from the circuit board right through to the carts. This makes it a bit difficult to remove. You'll require a soldering iron here and some basic soldering skills. It's best to melt the solder on the circuit board to remove the wires. I accidentally snapped mine. It's very easy to do as the wires are so thin so be careful.

    So this is my current situation. I need to clean all my parts now so it'll be some time before I post updates. Once the parts are cleaned I'll be wrapping the face plate and replacing the decals on the face too. Unfortunately the cleaning product you need to use will remove all text and any kind of printed labels or stickers so you'll need to have these remade if you want to keep them in the future. As I work in the sign and graphics industry this is easy and cheap for me to do myself. I'll probably be doing some custom labels on it rather than replacing the original logos but we'll see how it goes. 
    Hopefully in my next update I'll have my colour chosen too 
  25. Like
    LabRat reacted to Cupe in hep me - need a track to mix with sweetness and light - itche and scratchie   
    Just do a backspin and drop it in lolz
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